March 6, 2017 |  written by IVX Health

How to Garden with a Chronic Illness

Gardening may seem like a hobby that's out of reach if you have a chronic illness.  But with some careful planning and some strategies, you can reap the myriad benefits of cultivating a garden, from adding some light exercise to your routine to enjoying the freshest food possible.  Ready to get started?  Read on for our strategies for gardening with a chronic illness. #1: Consider What You'd Most Like to Grow It's easy to get carried away when you start looking at all the things you could grow, and fair warning, it only seems to get worse every year you have a garden! But if this is your first year gardening (ever, or since you've been diagnosed), you may want to start smaller.  Think about what you'd most enjoy growing, whether it's tomatoes, cucumbers, herbs or even flowers. #2: Consider Your Limitations Now that you've got your list of plants, you can start thinking about how to manage them with your particular set of challenges.  The internet is full of great ideas for unique planting methods, from raised beds, to container/bag gardens, to vertical planting.  Some planting methods are better suited to some kinds of plants, but many of the most popular plants can be grown in less traditional ways.  You can also start with seedlings rather than seeds to get a headstart. #3: Enlist Help to Get Started Here's perhaps the hardest part of starting a garden: ask for help.  Once you have your garden set up, you may be able to handle most of the tasks yourself.  But setting up raised beds or filling pots with soil can require more energy or strength than you might have.  Enlisting the help of a friend, family member, or even a green-thumbed neighbor will ensure your garden gets off on the right foot. #4: Add Garden Maintenance to Your Routine There's really just one thing that needs to happen every day for your garden -- watering.  If you're using a raised bed, a soaker hose can make it easy to water your garden without lugging a watering can around.  If you do need to use a watering can, choose a time of day when you have the most energy.  Plants really aren't too picky about when they get their water as long as they get it. #5: Enjoy the Harvest Once your plants start producing, you'll get to enjoy the best part of gardening: reaping what you've sown!  If you have some physical challenges that make harvesting your food difficult, this is another great time to enlist help, especially if you offer to share your bounty.  Take notes about what worked and what didn't work for your garden so you can improve your processes next year too. Take Care of Yourself with IVX Health Just like a garden requires care and attention, so does your health!  If IV infusions are a part of your health plan, then consider scheduling your next appointment at IVX Health.  IVX Health makes it possible for you to get your treatment and engage in self-care with a spa-like environment and the comforts of home at any of our offices.  You can receive your IV treatment while catching up on your favorite TV shows on our HDTVs, digging into the latest hit novel on our eReaders, or by simply hanging out with friends or family in your own private room.  You can bring your laptop and work if you’re on a tight deadline at work, or you can even bring your spouse and call it a date!  It’s the right care at the right place to get your health on track. We’re invested in helping you live your best life, so we offer appointments during days, evenings and on Saturdays at any of our convenient locations.  If you’re ready to experience the difference IVX Health can make in your life, give us a call at any of our locations.

Gardening may seem like a hobby that’s out of reach if you have a chronic illness.  But with some careful planning and some strategies, you can reap the myriad benefits of cultivating a garden, from adding some light exercise to your routine to enjoying the freshest food possible.  Ready to get started?  Read on for our strategies for gardening with a chronic illness.

#1: Consider What You’d Most Like to Grow

It’s easy to get carried away when you start looking at all the things you could grow, and fair warning, it only seems to get worse every year you have a garden! But if this is your first year gardening (ever, or since you’ve been diagnosed), you may want to start smaller.  Think about what you’d most enjoy growing, whether it’s tomatoes, cucumbers, herbs or even flowers.

#2: Consider Your Limitations

Now that you’ve got your list of plants, you can start thinking about how to manage them with your particular set of challenges.  The internet is full of great ideas for unique planting methods, from raised beds, to container/bag gardens, to vertical planting.  Some planting methods are better suited to some kinds of plants, but many of the most popular plants can be grown in less traditional ways.  You can also start with seedlings rather than seeds to get a headstart.

#3: Enlist Help to Get Started

Here’s perhaps the hardest part of starting a garden: ask for help.  Once you have your garden set up, you may be able to handle most of the tasks yourself.  But setting up raised beds or filling pots with soil can require more energy or strength than you might have.  Enlisting the help of a friend, family member, or even a green-thumbed neighbor will ensure your garden gets off on the right foot.

#4: Add Garden Maintenance to Your Routine

There’s really just one thing that needs to happen every day for your garden — watering.  If you’re using a raised bed, a soaker hose can make it easy to water your garden without lugging a watering can around.  If you do need to use a watering can, choose a time of day when you have the most energy.  Plants really aren’t too picky about when they get their water as long as they get it.

#5: Enjoy the Harvest

Once your plants start producing, you’ll get to enjoy the best part of gardening: reaping what you’ve sown!  If you have some physical challenges that make harvesting your food difficult, this is another great time to enlist help, especially if you offer to share your bounty.  Take notes about what worked and what didn’t work for your garden so you can improve your processes next year too.

Take Care of Yourself with IVX Health

Just like a garden requires care and attention, so does your health!  If IV infusions are a part of your health plan, then consider scheduling your next appointment at IVX Health.  IVX Health makes it possible for you to get your treatment and engage in self-care with a spa-like environment and the comforts of home at any of our offices.  You can receive your IV treatment while catching up on your favorite TV shows on our HDTVs, digging into the latest hit novel on our eReaders, or by simply hanging out with friends or family in your own private room.  You can bring your laptop and work if you’re on a tight deadline at work, or you can even bring your spouse and call it a date!  It’s the right care at the right place to get your health on track.

We’re invested in helping you live your best life, so we offer appointments during days, evenings and on Saturdays at any of our convenient locations.  If you’re ready to experience the difference IVX Health can make in your life, give us a call at any of our locations.

Treatment at IVX Health

If biologics like Remicade, Actemra or Orencia  are a part of your chronic illness treatment plan, then consider choosing IVX Health for your ongoing care needs. IVX Health makes it possible to receive your therapy in a comfortable, convenient, and private environment.

With a private suite for every patient, you can watch your favorite Netflix show or movie on the big screen TV in each room, use a laptop or other mobile device to surf the web, or simply hang out with family and friends. We always have chairs for guests, and each center has a family room that is spacious and private if you need to bring your kids to your treatment. We also offer flexible appointment scheduling – including evenings and Saturdays – at any of our convenient locations.

At IVX Health, we truly are invested in helping you live your best life. If you’re ready to experience a new kind of infusion clinic, click here to learn how to move your infusion or injection therapy to IVX Health.

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